TFT launching in Salt Lake City, Utah!

TFT is launching in Utah on Monday (August 1st), with Thai Garden as our inaugural partner!  If you live in Salt Lake City, stop by and enjoy a healthy meal for a good cause!

TFT menu items at Thai Garden:

  • S4. Som Tom (Papaya salad): Shredded green papaya seasoned with lime juice, chili, tomatoes and green beans
  • S11. Yum Tofu. Fried tofu seasoned with lime juice, cucumber, onions and tomatoes.

Here’s a recent article in the City Weekly discussing the launch.

 

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This makes sense

In this post, Mark Bittman (an op-ed columnist I recommend) suggests adding a tax on unhealthy food (e.g. soda, French fries) and using that money to subsidize healthy foods.  The idea is nothing new, but it just makes plain sense.  And everyone benefits –the government can lower health care costs – something it can really use right now – and people will become healthier.  I understand that various agricultural lobbies make this difficult, but this one is too logical to forego…

[The average American consumed 44.7 gallons of soft drinks in 2010 – from Mark Bittman’s blog]

Drought and Emerging Famine in the Horn of Africa

The Horn of Africa (including northern Kenya, southeastern Ethiopia, southern Somalia and Djibouti) is suffering from one of the worst droughts in recent history – some say the worst in 60 years.  Experts estimate that between 10 and 11 million are in need of emergency food aid.

We can blame this emerging crisis on just a bad season, or point to the real culprits:

1)   (Human-induced) climate change that has resulted in extreme weather conditions

2)   Food policies, consumption behavior, and commodities trading that have all contributed to the rise in food prices (especially of staple crops) in recent years

3)   Poor prevention and coping mechanisms in these countries, at least partially the result of a lack of resources.  Western donors are slow to act yet again.

Crisis at this scale is rare and thus is making the news, but a large segment of the population in this region is constantly living on the brink of famine.


(The Economist, July 7th)